English 2201 Comparative Essay

Which of the two essay structures works better when responding to the example essay question?

Structure A

IntroductionHow both talk about family relationships between parents and children
Paragraph 1How Walking Away deals with family relationships - themes and form, structure and language
Paragraph 2 How Eden Rock deals with family relationships - themes and form, structure and language
Paragraph 3 Ways in which they are similar
Paragraph 4 Ways in which they are different
Conclusion Sum up comparison

Structure B

IntroductionHow both talk about family relationships between parents and children
Paragraph 1How the themes and ideas of Walking Away and Eden Rock are similar and different
Paragraph 2 How the form and structure of Walking Away and Eden Rock compare and how this links to their effect
Paragraph 3 How the language of Walking Away and Eden Rock compare and how this links to their effect
Conclusion Sum up comparison

Feedback

Either of the examples above could produce a good essay as they both explore each poem and compare their similarities and differences. However in structure B, the comparison takes place throughout the whole essay and avoids looking at the poems separately. This is a better model to use and one which can be applied to comparisons of other poems.

Explore the study guide for 'Walking Away' .

Preparatory Courses

0701. Introduction to Academic Discourse (4 s.h.) F S.

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0040.)

English 0701 focuses on writing within a single theme, working on ungraded multiple drafts for assignments, developing skills in summary and textual support presented in appropriate context. Students create a portfolio of their work, including at least four sequenced assignments that culminate in a final project that pulls together critical and literary texts. Multiple individual conferences with the instructor.

Note: Students placed in English 0701 must earn a final grade of C- or higher in order to be eligible to enroll in English 0802 or English 0812. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed any of the following courses: English 0711, 1001, 1002, 1011, 1012, 0040, 0041, C050, C051, or R050.

0711. Introduction to Academic Discourse ESL (4 s.h.) F S.

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0041.)

The guidelines for English 0701 are followed in this course, but in the ESL writing classroom there are cross-cultural implications both of what it means to do academic work and also what it means to share historical and cultural knowledge. Oral participation is encouraged as a way of developing fluency and enhancing comfort with participation in American academic settings. Classes are smaller than in English 0701, and teachers spend extended time in tutorial conferences with students.

Note: English 0711 is designed to accommodate the needs of the ESL learner. Students placed in English 0711 must earn a final grade of C- or higher in order to be eligible to enroll in English 0802 or English 0812. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed any of the following courses: English 0701, 1001, 1002, 1011, 1012, 0040, 0041, C050, C051, or R050.

General Education

0802. Analytical Reading and Writing (4 s.h.) F S. RCI: GW.

Duplicate Courses: This course may not be taken for credit by students who have successfully completed English 0812, 0902, 1002, 1012, 1022, 1977, 1978, C050, C051, H090, or R050.

English 0802 takes a broader perspective than 0701 (formerly 0040), requiring students to explore a single theme from the point of multiple disciplines. Early in the semester, English 0802 students work on research and the evaluation of sources, moving through a sequence of papers that develop argumentation and the synthesis of materials. Library research is required, and sessions with librarians are part of the course. Individual and small group conferences will be held during the semester. Evaluation is predicated on a passing final portfolio of at least four assignments that are developed through multiple revisions.

Note: English 0802 is a prerequisite for IH 0851/0852 (formerly Intellectual Heritage 1196 and 1297), any writing intensive courses, and any course in the College of Liberal Arts numbered 2000-4999.

0812. Analytical Reading and Writing: ESL (4 s.h.) F S. RCI: GW.

Duplicate Courses: English 0812 may not be taken for credit by students who have successfully completed English 0802, 0902, 1002, 1012, 1022, 1977, 1978, C050, C051, H090, or R050.

English 0812 is designed to accommodate the needs of the ESL learner. The guidelines for English 0802 are followed in this course, but in the ESL writing classroom there are cross-cultural implications both of what it means to do academic work and also what it means to share historical and cultural knowledge. Oral participation is encouraged as a way of developing fluency and enhancing comfort with participation in American academic settings.

Note: English 0812 is a prerequisite for IH 0851/0852 (formerly Intellectual Heritage 1196 and 1297), any writing intensive courses and any courses in the College of Liberal Arts numbered 2000-4999. Classes are smaller than in English 0802, and teachers spend extended time in tutorial conferences with students.

0815. Language in Society (3 s.h.) RCI: GB.

How did language come about? How many languages are there in the world? How do people co-exist in countries where there are two or more languages? How do babies develop language? Should all immigrants take a language test when applying for citizenship? Should English become an official language of the United States? In this course we will address these and many other questions, taking linguistic facts as a point of departure and considering their implications for our society. Through discussions and hands-on projects, students will learn how to collect, analyze, and interpret language data and how to make informed decisions about language and education policies as voters and community members.

Note: This course fulfills the Human Behavior (GB) requirement for students under GenEd and Individual & Society (IN) for students under Core.

Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed any of the following: ANTHRO 0815, Asian Studies 0815, Chinese 0815, EDUC 0815, Italian 0815, PSYCH 0815, Russian 0815, Spanish 0815, or CSC+DIS 0815.

0822. Shakespeare in the Movies (3 s.h.) RCI: GA.

Love and political ambition and violence and evil and laughter and wit and racial antagonism and the battle between the sexes and the joy and misery of being human � Shakespeare�s plays are about all of that. Discover how they work in film and video. Learn to read films and understand what actors, directors, composers, set designers, cinematographers, etc. do to bring the bard�s plays to life. We will view Merchant of Venice, Richard III, Othello, Much Ado about Nothing, and Romeo and Juliet and study how these plays got from the page to the screen. We will look at actors of the present day � Pacino, McKellen, Hopkins, Hoskins, Fishburne, Branagh, Thompson, DiCaprio, Danes, etc. and also at giants of the past, like Laurence Olivier, to see how actors create their roles. This course includes group work in reviewing film techniques, innovative writing instruction, and an introduction to research. You will have access to whole plays and to selected clips streamed to your computer.

Note: This course fulfills the Arts (GA) requirement for students under GenEd and Arts (AR) for students under Core.

Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed English 0922.

0824. The Quest for Utopia (3 s.h.) RCI: GB.

The extreme version of �the grass is always greener on the other side� has been a vision of a mythical place where all is peace, balance, perfection and happiness. The concept of utopia � somewhere better than this � has been with us for centuries, but what drives it? And why, when the quest is for betterment and maximum benefit for all, do utopias so often go bad? This course will examine what visions of utopia and dystopia have existed in literature from around the world. We will look at it alongside writing from a variety of disciplines to try to understand why utopia resists our reach, and the kind of behavior, for better and for worse, that the quest for utopia brings about.

Note: This course fulfills the Human Behavior (GB) requirement for students under GenEd and Individual & Society (IN) for students under Core.

Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed English 0924.

0826. Creative Acts (4 s.h.) RCI: GA.

This course focuses on the art of writing, finding one�s voice, and writing for different genres. In a small classroom setting, you will work with the faculty member and other students to improve your writing through work-shopping. Other readings will allow you to develop your craft. By the end of the semester, you will produce a portfolio of your work.

Note: This course fulfills the Arts (GA) requirement for students under GenEd and Arts (AR) for students under Core.

Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed English 0926.

0834. Representing Race (3 s.h.) RCI: GD.

From classical Greece and Rome, who saw themselves under siege by the �barbarian hoards,� to contemporary America and its war on �Islamic extremism,� from �The Birth of a Nation� to �Alien Nation�, Western societies have repeatedly represented a particular group of people as a threat to civilization. This course will examine a wide range of representations of non-Western people and cultures in film, literature, scientific and legal writings, popular culture, and artistic expression. What is behind this impulse to divide the world into �us� and �them�? How is it bound up with our understanding of race and racial difference? And what happens when the �barbarian hoards� talk back?

Note: This course fulfills the Race & Diversity (GD) requirement for students under GenEd and Studies in Race (RS) for students under Core.

Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed AF-AM S 0834, Anthropology 0834, Asian Studies 0834,English 0934, or History 0834.

0837. Eating Cultures (3 s.h.) RCI: GB.

You are what you eat, they say, but what, precisely, determines our eating habits and what, exactly, do they say about us? How do these habits influence our relations with others in our communities and beyond? Eating is an activity common to all human beings, but how do the particularities and meanings attributed to this activity vary across different times and places? Using literature, visual media, cookbooks, food-based art, and advertisements as our starting point, we will examine how food perception, production, preparation, consumption, exchange, and representation structure individual and communal identities, as well as relations among individuals and communities around the globe. Our focus on this most basic of needs will allow us to analyze how food conveys and limits self-expression and creates relationships as well as delimits boundaries between individuals and groups. Materials will be drawn from a wide range of disciplines including, but not limited to, literary and gender studies, psychology, anthropology, history, sociology, and economics.

Note: This course fulfills the Human Behavior (GB) requirement for students under GenEd and Individual & Society (IN) for students under Core.

0849. Dissent in America (3 s.h.) RCI: GU.

(Formerly: GE-US 0061.)

Throughout American history individuals and groups of people, have marched to the beat of a different drummer, and raised their voices in strident protest. Study the story and development of dissent in America. How has dissent shaped American society? In addition to studying the historical antecedents of dissent students will have first-hand experience visiting and studying a present-day dissent organization in the Philadelphia area to investigate connections between the history of dissent and the process of making dissenting opinion heard today.

Note: This course fulfills the U.S. Society (GU) requirement for students under GenEd and American Culture (AC) for students under Core.

Students cannot receive credit for English 0849/0949 if they have successfully completed History 0849/0949 or SOC 0849.

0855. Higher Education and American Life: Mirror to a Nation (3 s.h.) RCI: GU.

You have decided to go to college. But why? What role will college and in particular Temple University play in your life? Reflect on this important question by looking at the relationship between higher education and American society. What do colleges and universities contribute to our lives? They are, of course, places for teaching and learning. They are also research centers, sports and entertainment venues, sources of community pride and profit, major employers, settings for coming-of-age rituals (parties, wild times, courtship, etc.), and institutions that create lifetime identities and loyalties. Learn how higher education is shaped by the larger society and how, in turn, it has shaped that society. Become better prepared for the world in which you have chosen to live for the next few years.

Note: This course fulfills the U.S. Society (GU) requirement for students under GenEd and American Culture (AC) for students under Core.

Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed AMER ST 0855 or ED ADM 0855.

0868. World Society in Literature & Film (3 s.h.) RCI: GG.

(Formerly: GE-WRLD 0060.)

Learn about a particular national culture�Russian, Indian, French, Japanese, Italian, for example, each focused upon in separate sections of this course�by taking a guided tour of its literature and film. You don�t need to speak Russian, Hindu, French or Japanese to take one of these exciting courses, and you will gain the fresh, subtle understanding that comes from integrating across different forms of human expression. Some of the issues that will be illuminated by looking at culture through the lens of literature and film: Family structures and how they are changing, national self-perceptions, pivotal moments in history, economic issues, social change and diversity.

Note: This course fulfills the World Society (GG) requirement for students under GenEd and International Studies (IS) for students under Core.

Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed any of the following: Arabic 0868/0968, ASIA ST 0868, Chinese 0868/0968, English 0968, French 0868/0968, German 0868/0968, Hebrew 0868, Italian 0868/0968, Japanese 0868/0968, Jewish Studies 0868, LAS 0868/0968, Russian 0868/0968, or Spanish 0868/0968.

General Education Honors

0902. Honors Literature/Reading/Writing (4 s.h.) F. RCI: GW.

Duplicate Courses: This course may not be taken for credit by students who have successfully completed English 0802, 0812, 1002, 1012, 1022, 1977, 1978, C050, C051, H090, or R050.

An introduction to various forms of literature, this course has a theme that is developed through critical reading and writing assignments. Research and multiple drafts of papers are required. This course follows the principles of Analytical Reading and Writing, and focuses on the same critical competencies.

Note: English 0902 is a prerequisite for IH 0851/0951 and 0852/0952 (formerly Intellectual Heritage 1196/1996 and 1297/1997), any writing intensive courses, and any courses in the College of Liberal Arts numbered between 2000 and 4999.

0922. Honors Shakespeare in the Movies (3 s.h.) RCI: GA.

Love and political ambition and violence and evil and laughter and wit and racial antagonism and the battle between the sexes and the joy and misery of being human � Shakespeare�s plays are about all of that. Discover how they work in film and video. Learn to read films and understand what actors, directors, composers, set designers, cinematographers, etc. do to bring the bard�s plays to life. We will view Merchant of Venice, Richard III, Othello, Much Ado about Nothing, and Romeo and Juliet and study how these plays got from the page to the screen. We will look at actors of the present day � Pacino, McKellen, Hopkins, Hoskins, Fishburne, Branagh, Thompson, DiCaprio, Danes, etc. and also at giants of the past, like Laurence Olivier, to see how actors create their roles. This course includes group work in reviewing film techniques, innovative writing instruction, and an introduction to research. You will have access to whole plays and to selected clips streamed to your computer.

Note: This course fulfills the Arts (GA) requirement for students under GenEd and Arts (AR) for students under Core.

Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed English 0822.

0924. Honors: The Quest for Utopia (3 s.h.) RCI: GB.

The extreme version of �the grass is always greener on the other side� has been a vision of a mythical place where all is peace, balance, perfection and happiness. The concept of utopia � somewhere better than this � has been with us for centuries, but what drives it? And why, when the quest is for betterment and maximum benefit for all, do utopias so often go bad? This course will examine what visions of utopia and dystopia have existed in literature from around the world. We will look at it alongside writing from a variety of disciplines to try to understand why utopia resists our reach, and the kind of behavior, for better and for worse, that the quest for utopia brings about.

Note: This course fulfills the Human Behavior (GB) requirement for students under GenEd and Individual & Society (IN) for students under Core.

Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed English 0824.

0926. Honors Creative Acts (4 s.h.) RCI: GA.

This course focuses on the art of writing, finding one�s voice, and writing for different genres. In a small classroom setting, you will work with the faculty member and other students to improve your writing through work-shopping. Other readings will allow you to develop your craft. By the end of the semester, you will produce a portfolio of your work.

Note: This course fulfills the Arts (GA) requirement for students under GenEd and Arts (AR) for students under Core.

Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed English 0826.

0934. Honors Representing Race (3 s.h.) RCI: GD.

From classical Greece and Rome, who saw themselves under siege by the �barbarian hoards,� to contemporary America and its war on �Islamic extremism,� from �The Birth of a Nation� to �Alien Nation�, Western societies have repeatedly represented a particular group of people as a threat to civilization. This course will examine a wide range of representations of non-Western people and cultures in film, literature, scientific and legal writings, popular culture, and artistic expression. What is behind this impulse to divide the world into �us� and �them�? How is it bound up with our understanding of race and racial difference? And what happens when the �barbarian hoards� talk back? (This is an Honors course.)

Note: This course fulfills the Race & Diversity (GD) requirement for students under GenEd and Studies in Race (RS) for students under Core.

Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed AF-AM S 0834, Anthropology 0834, Asian Studies 0834, English 0834, or History 0834.

0949. Honors Dissent in America (3 s.h.) RCI: GU.

(Formerly: GE-US H061.)

Throughout American history individuals and groups of people, have marched to the beat of a different drummer, and raised their voices in strident protest. Study the story and development of dissent in America. How has dissent shaped American society? In addition to studying the historical antecedents of dissent students will have first-hand experience visiting and studying a present-day dissent organization in the Philadelphia area to investigate connections between the history of dissent and the process of making dissenting opinion heard today. (This is an Honors course.)

Note: This course fulfills the U.S. Society (GU) requirement for students under GenEd and American Culture (AC) for students under Core.

Students cannot receive credit for English 0849/0949 if they have successfully completed History 0849/0949 or SOC 0849.

0968. Honors World Society in Literature & Film (3 s.h.) RCI: GG.

Learn about a particular national culture�Russian, Indian, French, Japanese, Italian, for example, each focused upon in separate sections of this course�by taking a guided tour of its literature and film. You don�t need to speak Russian, Hindu, French or Japanese to take one of these exciting courses, and you will gain the fresh, subtle understanding that comes from integrating across different forms of human expression. Some of the issues that will be illuminated by looking at culture through the lens of literature and film: Family structures and how they are changing, national self-perceptions, pivotal moments in history, economic issues, social change and diversity. (This is an Honors course.)

Note: This course fulfills the World Society (GG) requirement for students under GenEd and International Studies (IS) for students under Core.

Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed any of the following: Arabic 0868/0968, ASIA ST 0868, Chinese 0868/0968, English 0868, French 0868/0968, German 0868/0968, Hebrew 0868, Italian 0868/0968, Japanese 0868/0968, Jewish Studies 0868, LAS 0868/0968, Russian 0868/0968, or Spanish 0868/0968.

0973. Honors Women in Modern Bengali Film (3 s.h.) RCI: GG.

We will discuss the work of contemporary Bengali film directors, as also that of a few non-Bengali directors of parallel and diasporic cinema, with a particular focus on culturally constructed roles for women in the Indian social context. The several films that we view in class, to analyze women�s movements out of such prescribed spaces into more liberating ones, will focus on assault; incest as taboo; the predicaments of the subaltern, the prostitute, and the widow; and the more recent issue of immigration. How do questions we raise in our course intersect with current international discussions of the treatment of women and class in film? Is the work done by women�s activist groups changing entrenched perceptions of gender worldwide and, thus, representations of women in film? What is the impact of significant events in Indian colonial and postcolonial history on women? How do key concepts addressed by major Western thinkers such as Karl Marx and Sigmund Freud affect depictions of women in cinema? You will look up websites on cinema and do group oral presentations to engage directly with these questions.

Note:This course fulfills the World Society (GG) requirement for students under GenEd and International Studies (IS) for students under Core.

0975. Honors Transnational Cinema (3 s.h.) RCI: GA.

As he recently commented on the sad state of globalized affairs in which �the cosmopolitanism of international filmmaking is matched by the parochialism of American film culture,� New York Times film critic A.O. Scott asked, �The whole world is watching, why aren�t Americans?� This course will use Scott�s question as a point of departure to investigate the ostensible reasons why Americans, or in our case, Philadelphians, aren�t watching �transnational cinema� � international films that gain distribution outside of their country of production, and that depict transnational movements of people, capital, and social values. Are transnational films playing at a theatre near you? Perhaps they are, but if not, why not? Which �foreign films� are allowed to cross the border into our country? How, when, and where do we get to �see the world� and why does that matter in today�s globalized, interconnected world? Learn �how to see the world� � not as a one-dimensional quaint or exotic representation of the �other� � but instead through the ways in which these films engage critical contemporary issues of nation, transnation, and globalization in an increasingly interconnected transnational public sphere.

Note: This course fulfills the Arts (GA) requirement for students under GenEd and Arts (AR) for students under Core.

Lower Division Courses

1009. Discovering English (1 s.h.) F S.

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0004.)

Designed for freshmen, sophomores, new transfer students, and those who have not declared a major, this course is an introduction to the English major at Temple. It offers an overview of the field of English Studies and the various options, resources, and opportunities available to majors, with an emphasis on academic and professional planning.

1022. College Composition (Race) (3 s.h.) F S SS. RCI: RC.

(Formerly: ENGLISH R050.)

Duplicate Courses: English 1022 (R050) may not be taken for credit by students who have successfully completed English 1977 (H090).

English 1022 (R050) is the same as 1002 (C050) except that the readings focus on the study of race.

Note: English 1002 (C050)/1012 (C051) or 1022 (R050) is a prerequisite for Intellectual Heritage 1196 (X051) and 1297 (X052) and any upper-level courses in the College of Liberal Arts. It meets the Core Studies in Race requirement as well as the Core Composition requirement.

1111. Introduction to Poetry (3 s.h.) F.

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0081.)

How to read and enjoy poetry. Students read various kinds of poems written in English such as the sonnet, elegy, dramatic monologue, and narrative, rather than survey the history of English and American poetry chronologically.

1131. Introduction to Drama (3 s.h.) F S. RCI: AR.

(Formerly: ENGLISH C083.)

How to read plays and enjoy them in the theater, how to recognize their cultural and human values and how to use principles of dramatic criticism. Readings from Sophocles through the moderns.

Note: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Arts (AR) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

1197. Introduction to Literature (3 s.h.) F S SS. RCI: AR & WI.

(Formerly: ENGLISH X084.)

A general introduction to the main types of literature (fiction, poetry, drama) with the goal of teaching the critical enjoyment of a variety of reading. Discussion of some major ways of addressing works of literature.

Note: This course can be used to satisfy a university Core Arts (AR) and Writing Intensive (WI) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

1198. Introduction to Fiction (3 s.h.) F S SS. RCI: WI.

(Formerly: ENGLISH W082.)

An introduction to various forms of fiction: tales, fables, stories, and novels. Focuses on close reading and analysis to develop an appreciation of creative works of fiction and skills in critical reading.

1301. American Literature (3 s.h.) F S. RCI: AC.

(Formerly: ENGLISH C056.)

Study of the complex variety of experience in America and how American literature is structured by issues: Native, black, and white; frontier and town; female and male; the individual self and the democratic life; private and public; traditional and radical. How literary works reflect historical, social, political, psychological, and cultural settings as well as specific periods and regional concerns.

Note: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core American Culture (AC) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

1801. Career Seminar (1 s.h.)

This course is designed to provide students with the resources and support to help them make informed decisions about career development. The course aims to provide its members the opportunity to meet faculty members representing the diversity of the major, professionals from the city who were English majors, and recent graduates who can talk about what the major has done for them and how they use it. Thus, one of the primary goals of this course is for English majors to learn how to become professionals and to assess a range of career opportunities.

1902. Honors Introduction to Literature (3 s.h.) F S SS. RCI: AR.

(Formerly: ENGLISH H094.)

A general introduction to the main types of literature (fiction, poetry, drama) with the goal of teaching the critical enjoyment of a variety of reading. Discussion of some major ways of addressing works of literature.

Note: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Arts (AR) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

1903. Honors Introduction to Drama (3 s.h.) F S. RCI: AR.

(Formerly: ENGLISH H093.)

How to read plays and enjoy them in the theater, how to recognize their cultural and human values and how to use principles of dramatic criticism. Readings from Sophocles through the moderns.

Note: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Arts (AR) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

1904. Honors American Literature (3 s.h.) F S. RCI: AC.

(Formerly: ENGLISH H096.)

Study of the complex variety of experience in America and how American literature is structured by issues: Native, black, and white; frontier and town; female and male; the individual self and the democratic life; private and public; traditional and radical. How literary works reflect historical, social, political, psychological, and cultural settings as well as specific periods and regional concerns.

Note: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core American Culture (AC) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

1977. Honors Introduction to Literature and Composition (3 s.h.) F. RCI: CO.

(Formerly: ENGLISH H090.)

An introduction to various forms of literature and to the rhetorical principles in composition. A combination of reading and writing assignments (5000 words minimum).

Note: Taken together with Intellectual Heritage 1996 (X091) and 1997 (X092) in sequence, this course fulfills the College Composition requirement.

1978. Honors Introduction to Literature & Composition - Race Version (3 s.h.) RCI: RC.

An introduction to various forms of literature and to the rhetorical principles in composition. A combination of reading and writing assignments (5000 words minimum) that investigate race.

Upper Division Courses

2000. Special Topics (3 s.h.) F.

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0150.)

Each section of this course explores a carefully defined theme, topic, or type of literature or writing, such as Asian-American literature, editing and publishing a literary magazine, etc.

Note: Variable content; consult the Undergraduate English Office or English web page for details.

2012. Literature and Criticism (3 s.h.) F S.

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0181.)

An introduction to criticism; some of the main approaches and theories used to interpret texts, with emphasis on modern schools. Such approaches as new criticism, psychoanalysis, social criticism, feminism, poststructuralism, cultural criticism, and new historicism. Readings in theory, with some literary texts as illustration.

2013. Intellectual Contexts of Literary Study (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0175.)

An introduction for majors and prospective majors to the intellectual climate which has shaped and influenced Anglo-American literary studies. Readings may include Nietzsche, Freud, DuBois, Dewey, Eliot, Trilling, deBeauvoir, Arendt, Fanon, Said.

2014. Myth and Symbol (3 s.h.) F.

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0159.)

A study of certain literary ideas and patterns that have persisted from ancient times to the present in varying forms. Readings may begin with classical texts in translation, and will include selected works of English and American literature from various periods.

2097. Introduction to English Studies (3 s.h.) F S. RCI: WI.

(Formerly: ENGLISH W100.)

This course is designed to introduce students to foundational skills needed for English studies and to foster habits of mind needed to analyze and write about the complex texts typically assigned throughout the English major. These skills include: 1) development of close reading skills; 2) knowledge of the methods of literary interpretation; 3) ability to understand and discuss the contradictions, complexities, and ambiguities of linguistically dense texts; 4) ability to discuss the relationship between form and meaning; 5) development of writing skills needed to succeed as an English major, including the ability to generate paper topics independently, the ability to revise substantively, and the ability to sustain a critical argument over 8 to 10 pages.

Note: Required of new English majors beginning in Fall 2002, to be taken in the first or second semester after declaring the major; strongly recommended for other English majors as well.

2111. The Short Story (3 s.h.) F S SS.

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0157.)

A reading of works by major short story writers, European and American, classic, modernist, and experimental, considering their form and language, and the way in which they refract experience rather differently from other literary kinds.

2112. Children�s Literature and Folklore (3 s.h.) S.

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0158.)

A study of the literature � the folk, fairy, court, and religious tales, the poetry and drama � either adapted to or written for children. How this literature, more influential than the Bible, forms and conveys cultural and aesthetic values, language, manners, political, social, and spiritual ideals. Emphasis on the genre as it emerged in the 18th century through the Victorian period in Europe and America.

2113. Popular Fiction (3 s.h.) SS.

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0163.)

Readings in recent popular fiction: approximately one novel a week or the equivalent. Focus may be on one or more genres, such as science fiction, detective novels, and the like.

Note: Variable content; consult the Undergraduate English Office or English web page for details.

2114. Social Issues in Literature (3 s.h.) S SS.

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0152.)

Specific social, cultural, and/or historical issues as represented in imaginative literature. Such topics as the racial interface of American fiction, social class in British and American literature, and the like.

Note: Variable content; consult the Undergraduate English Office or English web page for details.

2196. Creative Writing: Poetry (3 s.h.) F S SS. RCI: WI.

(Formerly: ENGLISH W107.)

Workshop in which students read and discuss one another’s material and develop skills as both writers and readers. Students may read selected contemporary American poets, but the main texts will be those produced by members of the class.

2197. Women in Literature (3 s.h.) F S SS. RCI: WI.

(Formerly: ENGLISH W160.)

Cross Listed with Women�s Studies 2197 (W126).

A study of selected literature by and about women.

Note: Variable content; consult the Undergraduate English Office or English web page for details.

2201. Survey of English Literature: Beginnings to 1660 (3 s.h.) F S SS.

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0114.)

Study of major texts, authors, and genres of British literature from the Middle Ages and the Renaissance in their historical and social settings. Emphasizes close textual analysis along with broad literary and cultural themes. Readings may include Beowulf, Chaucer, and Sir Gawain; Sidney, Jonson, Lady Mary Wroth, the Metaphysical Poets (Donne, Marvell, and others), and Katherine Philips, as well as Shakespeare and Milton.

Note: Required for all English majors. Should be taken before most upper-level courses.

2202. Survey of English Literature: 1660-1900 (3 s.h.) F S SS.

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0115.)

A continuation of English 2201 (0114). A study of major texts, authors, and genres of British literature from the Restoration through the 18th century, romantic, and Victorian periods in their historical and social settings. Emphasizes close textual analysis along with broad literary and cultural themes. Readings may include Dryden, Behn, Pope, Johnson, Blake, Wordsworth, Keats, Hemans, E. B. Browning, R. Browning, Dickens, Arnold, and Wilde.

Note: Required for all English majors. Should be taken before most upper-level courses.

2211. Arthurian Literature (3 s.h.) S.

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0130.)

An exploration of the mythological and historical aspects of the legends surrounding King Arthur and the Round Table, concentrating on the chief British and continental works involving such subjects as Arthur, Merlin, and the Lady of the Lake, Lancelot and Guenevere, Tristan and Isolde, Gawain, Perceval, and the Grail.

2296. Creative Writing: Fiction (3 s.h.) F S SS. RCI: WI.

(Formerly: ENGLISH W108.)

Workshop in which students read and discuss one another�s material and develop skills as both writers and readers. Students may read selected contemporary American works of fiction, but the main texts will be those produced by members of the class. Beginning writers welcome, but thorough grounding in the conventions of grammar, spelling, and punctuation essential.

2297. Shakespeare (3 s.h.) F S SS. RCI: WI.

(Formerly: ENGLISH W133.)

A study of major plays of Shakespeare, usually chosen from among the comedies, tragedies, and histories. Teaches appropriate principles of literary analysis, with some attention to social and intellectual background and Elizabethan stage techniques. May focus primarily on the plays as literature, or may study them as performed texts.

2301. Survey of American Literature I (3 s.h.) F S SS.

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0116.)

A survey of American literature from the colonial and federalist periods and the New England renaissance of the mid-19th century in its historical and social settings. Emphasizes close textual analysis along with broad literary and cultural themes. Literary forms include diaries, letters, sermons, poetry, fiction, travel narratives, and historical chronicles. Authors such as Bradstreet, Taylor, Edwards, Franklin, Paine, Jefferson, Wheatley, Freneau, Irving, Bryant, Hawthorne, Melville, Poe, Emerson, Thoreau, and Emily Dickinson.

Note: Required for all English majors. Should be taken before most upper-level courses.

2302. Survey of American Literature II (3 s.h.) F S SS.

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0117.)

A survey of American literature from the late 19th century to the present in its historical and social settings. Emphasizes close textual analysis along with broad literary and cultural themes. Broad literary movements, such as Realism, Naturalism, Modernism, and Postmodernism; historical and cultural contexts, e.g., the Harlem Renaissance, the Great Depression, the Vietnam War; issues of gender construction, racial and ethnic consciousness, the growth of cities, and technology. Authors may include: Chopin, Wharton, James, Twain, Norris; Du Bois, Dunbar, Hughes, Hurston; Frost, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Pound, Eliot, Millay, Loy; Ginsberg, Baraka, Sanchez; Roth, Mukherjee, Alexie.

Note: Required for all English majors. Should be taken before most upper-level courses.

2341. American Playwrights (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0124.)

A study of American playwrights from O�Neill to the present. Principles of dramatic analysis, the distinctively American qualities of the plays and their debt to modern European drama. Writers may include Williams, Miller, Hellman, Hansberry, Baraka, Fuller, Wilson, Mamet, Rabe, Fornes, Shepard.

2396. Creative Writing: Plays (3 s.h.) F S. RCI: WI.

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0109.)

Workshop in which students read and discuss one another�s material and develop skills as both writers and readers. Students may consider dramatic and stylistic problems in selected contemporary American plays, but the main texts will be those produced by members of the class.

2401. African-American Literature I (3 s.h.) F S SS. RCI: RS.

(Formerly: ENGLISH R125.)

A survey of African-American literature from its beginnings to the early 20th century--poetry, prose, slave narratives, and fiction--including the works of authors such as Phyllis Wheatley, Frederick Douglass, W. W. Brown, Harriet Wilson, Frances E. W. Harper, Charles Chesnutt, B.T. Washington, J.W. Johnson, and W.E.B. DuBois. An examination of racial consciousness as a theme rooted in social and historical developments, with special emphasis on national, cultural, and racial identity, color, caste, oppression, resistance, and other concepts related to race and racism emerging in key texts of the period.

Note: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Studies in Race (RS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

2402. African-American Literature II (3 s.h.) F S SS. RCI: RS.

(Formerly: ENGLISH R126.)

A survey of African-American literature from 1915 to the present, including poetry, prose, fiction, and drama. Analysis of developments in racial consciousness, from �race pride� to the Black Aesthetic and the influences on literature brought about by interracial conflicts, social and historical concepts such as assimilation and integration, and changing notions of culture. Authors such as Toomer, Hughes, McKay, Hurston, Brown, Larsen, Wright, Baldwin, Hansberry, Ellison, Baraka, Morrison, and others.

Note: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Studies in Race (RS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

2496. Introduction to Writing Non-Fiction (3 s.h.) F S. RCI: WI.

(Formerly: ENGLISH W101.)

This course introduces students to the demands of writing articles and stories drawn from observation, reflection, and analysis for a public audience. Genres highlighted in the course may include travel writing, character portraits, public argument, and memoir.

2511. Modern Poetry (3 s.h.) S.

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0161.)

An introduction to 20th century poetry which views Modernist poetry in light of postmodern perspectives. Topics may include innovation, formalism, contemporary alternatives to Modernism, new directions in post-War and postmodern poetry.

2512. The Modern Novel (3 s.h.) S.

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0154.)

An introduction to Modernism in the work of several major novelists, such as James, Conrad, Lawrence, Joyce, Faulkner, Proust, Mann, and Kafka. Emphasis on social and intellectual background, literary methods, and psychological, philosophical and political implications of Modernism.

2513. Modern Drama (3 s.h.) F.

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0155.)

A study of major works of representative late 19th century and early 20th century playwrights, such as Ibsen, Strindberg, Chekhov, Pirandello, O�Neill, Shaw. Emphasis on social and intellectual background, dramatic art, and the role of theater in social controversy.

2521. Contemporary Literature (3 s.h.) S.

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0162.)

An examination of important trends through selected literary works of the late 20th century. Emphasis on American fiction, with a sampling of works from other countries and genres. Authors may include Bellow, Coover, Pynchon, DeLillo, Morrison, Hughes, Calvino, Garcia Marquez.

2596. Writing for Business and Industry (3 s.h.) F S SS. RCI: WI.

(Formerly: ENGLISH W104.)

Meets the writing needs of people in business and industry and students who plan professional careers. Extensive practice in various forms of writing appropriate to all levels of management, including reports, proposals, memoranda, and letters. Instruction in research techniques and the writing of a formal researched report on a business topic. Job applications, letters of inquiry, and resum�s. Some impromptu writing exercises.

2601. Introduction to Postcolonial Literatures (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0140.)

An introduction to modern world literatures in English (or in translation) within the context of colonialism, anti-colonial resistance, and postcolonial movements. Content and geographical focus vary each semester: a sample of authors to be studied might include Clarice Lispector, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Assia Djebar, Ama Ata Aidoo, Maryse Conde, Zoe Valdes, Derek Walcott, Chinua Achebe, Anita Desai, Salman Rushdie, Michael Ondaatje, among others. The course can be repeated for credit with different topics. Students should consult the department�s �Announcement of Classes� for current offerings before registering in the class.

2696. Technical Writing (3 s.h.) F S SS. RCI: WI.

(Formerly: ENGLISH W102.)

For students in engineering and related fields. Covers style, organization, and mechanics of technical papers, with emphasis on special problems that face the technical writer: analyses and descriptions of objects and processes, reports, proposals, business correspondence, and research papers. Students write a number of short reports and one long research paper. By the end of the course, professional standards of accuracy in mechanics and presentation are expected. Some impromptu writing exercises.

2702. Film History I: 1890-1945 (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0173.)

Prerequisite: English 2097 (W100).

This course introduces students to the major periods and technological developments in film history from its origins in various 19th century technologies and amusements to the end of World War II. The course will address some of the fundamental phases and international movements in cinema history, focusing on film as a technology, institution, and art form. A range of genres and national cinemas representative of the aesthetic and economic contexts of global media cultures will be examined. The course will be framed by a variety of critical issues in film historiography.

2703. Film History II: 1946-Present (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0174.)

Prerequisite: English 2097 (W100).

This course introduces students to the major periods and technological developments in film history from the end of World War II to the present. The course will address some of the fundamental phases and international movements in cinema history, focusing on film as a technology, institution, and art form. A range of genres and national cinemas representative of the aesthetic and economic contexts of global media cultures will be examined. The course will be framed by a variety of critical issues in film historiography.

2711. Introduction to Cinema Studies (3 s.h.) F S.

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0170.)

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of film analysis. Students will learn about the construction of film narrative, as well as about formal elements of film, including principles of editing, mise-en-scene, and sound. The course also provides an introduction to issues in film studies including the meaning of film genre, the role of the film star, and authorship in the cinema. The course will focus on narrative feature films from the Classical Hollywood cinema, but will include attention to nonfiction practice as well as avant-garde European and Soviet alternatives to Hollywood. Films discussed include works by Hitchcock, Porter, Griffith, Vertov, Lang, Renoir, Hawks, Deren, and Welles.

Note: In conjunction with English 2297 (W133), may be offered as Shakespeare in Film.

2712. International Film (3 s.h.) F.

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0172.)

An examination, through masterpieces of world cinema, of international film cultures and national cinemas, with emphasis on the cultural, sociopolitical, and theoretical contexts. Offers a global context for film and other arts.

Note: Variable content; may be given as post-World War II European film, French film, Third World film; consult the Undergraduate English Office or English web page for details.

2713. Art of the Film (3 s.h.) SS. RCI: RS.

(Formerly: ENGLISH R170.)

An exploration of the black presence in American films from the racist portrayals in The Birth of a Nation, the Stepin Fetchit films, and Gone with the Wind, through the blaxploitation films like Shaft and Superfly, culminating in recent black cinema from directors such as Melvin Van Peebles, Spike Lee and John Singleton.

Note: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Studies in Race (RS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

2796. Writing the Research Essay (3 s.h.) F S. RCI: WI.

(Formerly: ENGLISH W103.)

Designed to improve writing skills in general and teach students to use library and online resources, conduct research, and organize and present the acquired information effectively. Readings may be assigned, but class and conference time are devoted principally to analysis and discussion of research and writing problems. Students write a total of approximately 5000 words in essays and exercises related to a research project.

2821. Introduction to Linguistics (3 s.h.) F S SS.

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0111.)

The nature and structure of human language: the universal properties of language, how languages resemble each other, how children learn languages, how sound and meaning are related to each other, how the mind processes language, and how geographic and social factors affect language. Attention to the scientific methods linguists use to test hypotheses.

Note: Not recommended for students who have had Anthropology 2507 (0127) and Communication Sciences 1108 (0108), or the equivalent.

2822. Language and Race (3 s.h.) RCI: RS.

(Formerly: ENGLISH R110.)

An investigation of language and race in order to evaluate accurately and objectively many common beliefs about the connections between the two. How all languages systematically organize sounds, grammar, and meanings, with a special emphasis on the structure of African American English; how particular ways of speaking may or may not affect one�s thought patterns or social identity; public policy issues involving language and race.

Note: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Studies in Race (RS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

2897. Literacy and Society (3 s.h.) F. RCI: WI.

(Formerly: ENGLISH W105.)

An exploration of the social context for reading and writing: how concepts of literacy can reinforce, elaborate, or threaten established social orders. Experiential study of how the written word is used; self-observation of our own writing practices and observation of others engaged in puzzling out the world through books, letters, pamphlets, flyers, newspapers, textbooks, billboards, signs, and labels. The purpose is to see literacy in action, see written documents shaping lives and see lives shaping written language. Reading about literacy, and a service or experiential component.

2898. Texts/Cultures of Science (3 s.h.) F. RCI: WI.

(Formerly: ENGLISH W106.)

How scientists write, and how their writing is read. Students with interests in the natural and social sciences are welcome, but no special background knowledge or expertise is required. Class work will include readings of scientific texts, including popularizations and science fiction; analysis of new forms such as scientific web sites; and possibly visits to science museums and workshops. The aim is to learn something about scientific literacy, and why so few people think they have it.

2900. Honors Special Topics (3 s.h.) RCI: HO.

(Formerly: ENGLISH H190.)

Continuity in Community: Poetry and Art Since 1950. This course is a hybrid: a study of the arts and community as well as a poetry writing workshop. As such, the class is intended for students interested in creative writing, art, and music. Baseline readings will most likely include Daniel Kane�s All Poets Welcome: the Lower East Side Poetry Scene in the 1960�s, which will be used to survey a sampling of arts groups/movements since 1950 such as Black Mountain, the San Francisco Renaissance, the New York School, and the Black Arts Movement. The poetry workshop will entail in-class creative and critical writing exercises. Student work will also be presented to the class for commentary and critique.

2901. Intermediate Honors: Developing Advanced Literacy in College (3 s.h.) S. RCI: HO.

(Formerly: ENGLISH H191.)

Although a variable content course, it often serves to prepare students to be peer tutors for first-year students in Temple�s basic composition courses. As part of the course requirements, students are required to keep journals, deliver reports, and write research papers.

Note: Variable content; consult the Undergraduate English Office or English web page for details.

2903. Honors Creative Writing: Plays (3 s.h.) RCI: HO.

(Formerly: ENGLISH H109.)

Workshop in which students read and discuss one another�s material and develop skills as both writers and readers. Students may consider dramatic and stylistic problems in selected contemporary American plays, but the main texts will be those produced by members of the class.

3001. History of Criticism (3 s.h.) F.

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0271.)

Prerequisite: English 2097 (W100).

A survey of literary criticism from Plato to the mid-20th century. Key questions in literary theory: What is literature compared to other forms of discourse? Does literature mimic or create? Does literary value adhere to or challenge standards of philosophical or empirical truth? What is the source of literary creation? How does literary value shape social change? These and other questions are addressed through readings in literary and theoretical texts.

3002. Contemporary Criticism (3 s.h.) S.

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0276.)

Prerequisite: English 2097 (W100).

Comparative study of literary theories from the 1960s to the present. Survey of several contemporary critical schools, including deconstructionist, neo-psychological, neo-Marxist, new historical, feminist, sociological, and aesthetic criticism.

3010. Special Topics I (3 s.h.) F.

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0281.)

Prerequisite: English 2097 (W100).

Advanced study in a specific area, usually concentrating on pre-1900 works.

Note: Variable content; consult undergraduate office or English web page for details.

3020. Special Topics II (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0282.)

Prerequisite: English 2097 (W100).

Advanced study in a specific area, usually concentrating on post-1900 works.

Note: Variable content; consult Undergraduate Office or English web page for details.

3082. Independent Study (1 to 3 s.h.) F S SS.

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0288.)

Prerequisite: English 2097 (W100). Proposals must be worked out with a supervisor and submitted to the Undergraduate Committee by November 20 for spring semester registration and April 15 for summer or fall registration.

Allows students in their junior and senior year to pursue serious independent research in a subject too specialized or too advanced to appear as a regular course offering.

3085. Career Internship (1 to 12 s.h.) F S SS.

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0200.)

Prerequisite: English 2097 (W100); Permission of instructor; G.P.A. of at least 3.0.

On-the-job training in positions in business, publishing, communications, or cultural institutions for juniors and seniors.

Note: One semester may be counted toward the English major. For additional information consult Prof. P. Robison, 215E, TUCC, prob@temple.edu.

3097. Feminist Theory (3 s.h.) S. RCI: WI.

(Formerly: ENGLISH W275.)

Prerequisite: English 2097 (W100).

Cross Listed with Women�s Studies 3097 (W363).

Readings in contemporary theorists who describe how the values of a culture are encoded in its language and who analyze the difficulty of escaping the prison house of language. How gender roles are created in and enforced by our symbol systems; how specific discourses change, how those changes can be facilitated, and how a new discourse is then read. Along with theoretical readings, some consideration of feminist applications of these strategies in politics, literature, music, and film.

3111. Italian Renaissance (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0255.)

This course covers major writers and works of the Italian Middle Ages and Renaissance: Dante, Petrarch, Boccaccio, Machiavelli, and Ariosto. Focus is placed on the rebirth of classical values and ideas, and their new forms of expression, which shall be known as the Renaissance. Due attention is given to such themes as the new concept of art and the new image of the artist through the study of Michelangelo�s poetry and Cellini�s Autobiography, as well as the concept of a united Italy, idealized from Dante through Machiavelli, but never historically achieved.

3112. Masterpieces of European Drama (3 s.h.) F.

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0216.)

Prerequisite: English 2097 (W100).

A reading and analysis of a wide range of continental European drama. Representative works from such great ages of drama as classical Greek and Roman, French neoclassic, and modern. Readings may include plays by Aeschylus, Euripides, Terence, Calderon, Racine, Moliere, Goethe, Ibsen, Chekhov, Brecht, and Beckett.

3196. Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry (3 s.h.) S. RCI: WI.

(Formerly: ENGLISH W203.)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of one 2000-level creative writing course--preferably 2196 (Creative Wrting: Poetry), but 2296, 2396, 2496 are acceptable; and one upper-level literature course. Admission by special authorization only.

Workshop intended to help advanced writers produce, revise, and critique poetry. The premise is that in order to learn to make poems, one needs to learn to read like a poet; in addition to producing original work, therefore, students may read and discuss work by certain contemporary poets.

3197. Themes and Genres in Women�s Literature (3 s.h.) F. RCI: WI.

(Formerly: ENGLISH W260.)

Prerequisite: English 2097 (W100).

Cross Listed with Women�s Studies 3197 (W128).

In-depth study of ideas, languages, and cultural stances in literature written by women.

Note: Variable content; consult Undergraduate English Office or English web page for details.

3211. Old English (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0230.)

Prerequisite: English 2097 (W100).

An introduction to the language, literature, and culture of Anglo-Saxon England. Short poems, excerpts from sermons, Bede, the Bible, and Beowulf. All works read in the original Old English.

Note: No previous knowledge of Old English necessary.

3212. Literature of the Medieval Period (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0231.)

Prerequisite: English 2097 (W100).

Literature of the Middle English period, as well as the relation of the literature to the traditions of medieval literature throughout Western Europe. Works may include The Owl and the Nightingale, Pearl, Piers Plowman, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, and selections from the mystery and morality plays, all usually read in the original in well-annotated texts.

Note: No previous knowledge of Middle English necessary.

3213. Chaucer (3 s.h.) F.

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0232.)

Prerequisite: English 2097 (W100).

This study of the first major poet of the English tradition will focus on the theoretical as well as practical problems he poses for the modern reader. Readings include early dream visions and the Canterbury Tales and selections from Chaucer�s sources and contemporaries to help students understand literary and social contexts.

Note: No previous experience with Middle English required.

3221. Advanced Shakespeare I (3 s.h.) S.

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0233.)

Prerequisite: English 2097 (W100).

In-depth readings of selected major plays, usually including histories, comedies, and tragedies. Close textual analysis, social context, and philosophical background.

Note: Assumes completion of at least one 2000-level literature course.

3222. Advanced Shakespeare II (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0234.)

Prerequisite: English 2097 (W100).

Readings in a small number of plays by Shakespeare which have presented special critical problems to scholars, general readers, and performers alike. How such problems define critical perspectives on the plays, and how some current critical modes of reading Shakespeare address these texts. Reading may include such plays as Troilus and Cressida, Measure for Measure, King Lear, Antony and Cleopatra, The Tempest, Cymbeline.

3223. Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0236.)

Prerequisite: English 2097 (W100).

Study of the extraordinarily talented and productive group of playwrights of the late 16th and early 17th centuries; such dramatists as Kyd, Marlowe, Jonson, Middleton, Webster, Ford, Dekker. Some attention to the plays as performances, and some consideration of social and intellectual contexts of the plays.

3224. Renaissance Writers (3 s.h.) S.

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0237.)

Studies in Tudor and Stuart literature. May focus on a single author or group of authors or be organized generically or thematically. Possible topics include Spenser, Elizabethan courtly literature, lyric, pastoral, and prose fiction.

Note: Variable content; see the Undergraduate English Office or English web page for details.

3225. Milton (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0238.)

Prerequisite: English 2097 (W100).

A study of John Milton�s poetry and prose in its cultural and historical context. The course will begin with shorter poems, such as �Lycidas�, and spend the majority of the semester on �Paradise Lost�. Selected prose will highlight Milton�s views on religion, divorce, and censorship.

3231. Restoration and 18th Century Literature (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0240.)

Prerequisite: English 2097 (W100).

Readings in the major texts, authors, genres, and cultural institutions of the period, 1660-1800. Classes may focus on more specialized time periods (like The Restoration) or topics (colonialism and literature) or genres (forms of comedy) or range more widely. Authors may include: Behn, Milton, Dryden, Rochester, Defoe, Swift, Finch, Pope, Addison, Steele, Montagu, Fielding, Richardson, Johnson, Boswell, Collins,Gray, and Burns.

3232. English Novel to 1832 (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0241.)

Prerequisite: English 2097 (W100).

A study of the complex emergence of the novel as a genre in English. Begins in the latter part of the 17th century and early 18th century with authors such as Bunyan and Behn and Defoe and then considers various foundational and revisionary texts, by authors including Richardson, Fielding, Lennox, Burney, and Sterne. Concludes with figures key to the Gothic, the novel of manners, and the historical novel, such as Radcliffe, Austen, and Scott. Key topics may include the relationship of the novel to changing understandings of fact and fiction, to shifting ideas of gender roles, to colonial expansion, and contests over national identity major novelists of the 18th century, beginning with authors Defoe, extending through Richardson, Fielding, Burney, and Sterne, and ending with Mary Shelley, Walter Scott, and Jane Austen. Emphasis on the social and cultural contexts, narrative form and style, and factors leading to the emergence of the novel as a genre in English.

3241. English Romanticism (3 s.h.) F.

(Formerly: ENGLISH 0242.)

0 thoughts on “English 2201 Comparative Essay”

    -->

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *